Why is data the new currency?

The EU GDPR came into force at the end of May 2018, and since then our data has become a currency. We now have the ability to earn money from our own data and this has to lead many to call it the “new oil”.

Before the GDPR, companies such as Facebook and Google-owned all of our data, so essentially they owned our currency. Now, this is no longer the case. The concept of Vendor Relationship Management has been around for some time, fuelled by the ambitions of those at places such as Harvard who believe that the internet giants use of our own private data is wrong.

All of our data has value and as the customer and owner of it, we should receive its value. Whether you are browsing for new clothes, a holiday, or cinema tickets, you should be able to publicise this fact and wait for the offers to come to you.

Killi is a new application owned by Freckle IoT which allows this to happen. Since its launch, big names such as Staceys, McDonald’s, and GM have already signed up and are paying money to people for the things that they sell them. Whilst Killi has its limitations, it is most definitely a step in the right direction.

Issues such as connecting to other sites through APIs that can be changed without warning can be overcome, and whilst it may not be paying out big bucks at the moment, this is just the beginning. The idea needs appropriate scale, and like the fax machine, it is useless if there is only one other person with the app. Whilst Killi has 70,000 subscribers and counting, it needs a lot more users before it will have any real value.

This is great news for those that were shaken by the Cambridge Analytica scandal or the fact that all internet companies have been shamelessly harvesting our user data without telling us.

What is really interesting about this concept, however, is the fact that it all takes place on the IoT via a blockchain platform. This is a great example of a real-world use case for both bits of tech and shows how easy it is to disappear this technology into everyday life. What’s more is, this is a great example of a company doing something sensible about the privacy issue rather than just writing an angry article or vowing to delete Facebook.

 

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